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Effects of audiovisual distraction in children with Down syndrome during dental restorations: a randomised clinical trial
 

Type:  Articles

Pubblication date:  06/2020

Authors:  S. Bagattoni, L. Lardani*, M.R. Gatto, M.R. Giuca*, G. Piana

Language:  English

Institution:  Department of Biomedical and NeuroMotor Sciences (DiBiNeM), Unit of Dental Care for Special Needs Patients and Paediatric Dentistry, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy *Department of Surgical, Medical, Molecular Pathology and Critical Area, Dental and Oral Surgery Clinic, Unit of Pediatric Dentistry, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy

Publication:  European Journal of Paediatric Dentistry

Publisher:  Ariesdue

Keywords:  Down Syndrome, Distraction, Behaviour.

Email:  [email protected]

URL:  https://ejpd.eu/EJPD_2020_21_2_11.pdf


Title:  Effects of audiovisual distraction in children with Down syndrome during dental restorations: a randomised clinical trial

Abstract:  Aim To evaluate the effect of audiovisual distraction on the dental chairside behaviour of children with Down syndrome (DS) during dental restorations and its influence on the operator stress and the duration of the appointment. Materials and Methods Study design: This randomised controlled trial included 48 children with DS requiring dental restorations. The study group was treated while wearing video eyeglasses, the control group with conventional behaviour management techniques. The child behaviour was evaluated using the revised Face, Leg, Activity, Cry, Consolability scale (r-FLACC) and the Frankl scale. The operator stress was evaluated using a VAS scale and the duration of the appointment was recorded. Results In the study group 64% of the children refused to wear the video eyeglasses during the whole duration of the dental treatment, the median r-FLACC score was significantly higher (p= 0.01552; Mann Whitney U test) and significantly more children showed a negative behaviour (68%vs 30%: p =0.011; Chi-square test). Conclusion Audiovisual distraction using video eyeglasses is not useful in managing the dental chairside behaviour of children with DS.

 
 
 
 
 
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