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Influence of simulated apical resorption following orthodontic treatment on working length determination: an in vitro study
 

Type:  Articles

Pubblication date:  09/2014

Authors:  D. Angerame*, M. De Biasi**, L. Marigo***, R. Castagnola****, F. Somma****, A. Castaldo*

Language:  English

Institution:  *University Clinic Department of Medical, Surgical and Health Sciences, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy **Graduate School of Nanotechnology, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy ***Department of Dental Materials, School of Dentistry, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy ****Department of Endodontics, School of Dentistry, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy

Publication:  European Journal of Paediatic Dentistry

Publisher:  Ariesdue Srl

Keywords:  Electronic apex locator; Orthodontics; Root resorption; Working length.

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Title:  Influence of simulated apical resorption following orthodontic treatment on working length determination: an in vitro study

Abstract:  Aim External apical root resorption (EARR) is a common complication that may occur during and after orthodontic treatment. In case of need of endodontic therapy for a tooth with EARR, it has not been clarified yet which benefits can be derived by the use of electronic apex locators (EALs). The present study aimed to assess the accuracy of EALs on extracted teeth before and after simulation of EARR subsequent to orthodontic treatment. Materials and methods Standard access cavities were prepared on 64 single-rooted teeth. After working length (CWL) determination, specimens were embedded in an alginate mass, connected to two EALs (Apit, Osada, Tokyo, Japan; Root ZX, Morita Corp., Tokyo, Japan) and the electronic working length (EWL) was measured. The apical portion of the specimens was then modified to simulate EARR, and the EWL was determined again. The discrepancy between CWL and EWL was regarded as statistical unit. Collected data underwent statistical analysis by means of non-parametric tests (p < 0.05). Results Within a range of 0.5 and 1.0 mm from CWL, the accuracies were 79.7% and 98.4% (Apit/intact tooth); 82.8% and 96.9% (Apit/simulated EARR); 81.3% and 98.4% (Root ZX/intact tooth); 76.6% and 96.9% (Root ZX/simulated EARR). No statistically significant differences in relation to device or apical condition emerged (p > 0.05). Conclusion The two considered EALs showed similar accuracy, which was not affected by the EARR simulation. The use of EALs in the treatment of teeth with EARR following orthodontic treatment may be useful.

 
 
 
 
 
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