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Comparison of oral Midazolam and Midazolam-Ketamine as sedative agents in paediatric dentistry
 

Type:  Articles

Pubblication date:  19/2010

Authors:  E. Cagiran*, C. Eyigor**, A. Sipahi***, H. Koca****, T. Balcioglu*****, M. Uyar******

Language:  English

Institution:  *Ege University Faculty of Medicine Anestesiology Dept, Izmir, Turkey **Ege University Faculty of Medicine Anestesiology Dept, Pain Clinic, Izmir, Turkey ***Ege University Faculty of Dentistry Oral and maxillofacial Surgery Dept, Izmir, Turkey ****Associate Professor, Ege University Faculty of Dentistry Oral and maxillofacial Surgery Dept, Izmir, Turkey *****Professor, Ege University Faculty of Medicine Anestesiology Dept, Izmir, Turkey ******Professor, Ege University Faculty of Medicine Anestesiology Dept, Pain Clinic, Izmir, Turkey

Publication:  European Journal of Paediatric Dentistry

Publisher:  Ariesdue Srl

Keywords:  Paediatric Dentistry; Oral sedation; Ketamine; Midazolam.

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Title:  Comparison of oral Midazolam and Midazolam-Ketamine as sedative agents in paediatric dentistry

Abstract:  Aim We compared the efficacy of sedation with oral Midazolam and a combination of oral Midazolam and Ketamine, used as alternatives to general anaesthesia during tooth extraction. Study Design: Retrospective study Materials and methods A total of 30 patients aged between 3 and 9 years, who had elective tooth extraction were included in the study. Subjects in Group A (n. 15) were given 0.75 mg/kg Midazolam orally while those in Group B (n. 15) were given 0.75 mg/kg Midazolam orally + 5 mg/kg ketamine. Acceptance of orally administered drugs, sedation and anxiety scores and reactions to local anaesthetic injection and tooth extraction were assessed. Results Sedation and anxiety scores in Group B were better than in Group A (p<0.05). Reactions to local anaesthetic injection and tooth extraction were very significantly less common in Group B (p<0.0001). Requirement for an additional medication was more common in Group A (p<0.05). Side effects were not observed in either group. Statistics: Patient demographics and time to discharge were analysed by Mann-Whitney U test, whereas Chi-square test was used to analyse compliance to sedation, anxiety and sedation scores, reaction to tooth extraction, side effects and additional drug requirement. Conclusion Compared to oral Midazolam only, a combination of oral Midazolam+Ketamine resulted in better sedation and surgical comfort in children during a painful procedure such as tooth extraction.

 
 
 
 
 
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